When you know it’s time to get a haircut

I live near a community center in Vancouver where, early in the morning, a service is offered for free for homeless people-you can get a hot shower, free coffee, free breakfast.

So last Sunday I was out walking with my son around the community center and this guy who was coordinating the service comes up to me, real nice-like and tells me where the coffee is…he thought I was too embarrassed to ask where it was, assumed I was a homeless guy…

OK I can take a hint. I got a haircut the next day.

Anyway on that note here is some new and interesting hair science mulletpresentation3.pdf.

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2 Responses to “When you know it’s time to get a haircut”

  1. kat Says:

    sorry. pretty unrelated to anything but… which community centre is this? i’m trying to research services for the homeless in Vancouver.

  2. Quote of the day: the philosophy of physics » Doctor Recommended Says:

    […] I have previously discussed one of the methodological debates between the likes of Betrand Russell, Henri Poincare, and indirectly, Ludwig von Mises (whose brother ironically was a positivist). Geordie Rose (who should blog more often, see his mullet post here) pointed to an interesting interview from the latest print edition of New Scientist. It is with physicist David Deutsch and is certainly worth the quick read. Below is one of the quotes that caught my eye: Logical positivism is a form of solipsism. If you say physics is only about predicting the outcomes of experiments, you can only really say it’s about experiments that you personally do, because to you any other person is just another thing you’re observing. But solipsism is a dead-end philosophy and when it comes to science it’s a poison. It doesn’t allow further progress from existing theories, and that’s why I think applications of quantum theory, particularly quantum computation, were overlooked for decades. You could say people didn’t really think the theory was true because they had rejected the idea of truth in science. Truth in science must mean correspondence to reality, or it means nothing. […]

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